#NationalPoetryMonth .@langleav’s poetry is a siren song for good in #Lullabies

Lang Leav returns with a second book of poetry that is made to sit beside your bed on the nightstand almost like a sort of dream-catcher to sing you to sleep when sleep is hard to come by.

Lullabies showcases a stronger writer as Leav’s poetry in this collection is very melancholy but highly emotive.

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One of my favorites in this collection is Her Words because it is a poem about a girl who writes, need I say more.

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#NationalPoetryMonth .@LangLeav ‘s #loveandmisadventure is a siren song for love lost and the hope of a future love that lasts

When I was a junior in college, I finally had my own room for the first time in my life.

Naturally, I was excited for how I would decorate my sacred dwelling since the choice was solely mine.

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I decided I wanted to have a poetry wall in one corner of my room and who’s poetry was showcased along the long wall near my door but the Tumblr poet, Lang Leav. Soon after this, I found out she was publishing her first poetry book and I was totally stoked for her as I had followed her literary career from the ground up.

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Boasting hand-drawn artwork and poetry from the author, Love & Misadventure is a book anyone who is hopeful for love despite all their misadventures and mistakes in love should own, and wants to reminisce every emotion that entails.

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#NationalPoetryMonth: Don’t Resist the Rebellion that engulfs you while reading Nikita Gill’s #WildEmbers

I admit to Instagram stalking Nikita Gill and her poetry.

The first time I ever read a poem by Ms. Gill I was in awe.

Then, a few months later, NetGalley sent me an email blast to tease new books

Normally, I delete them without reading because I have a queue of 80 books, do I really need anymore books?

The voice in my head always whispers, “Yes!”

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This time I was glad I opened it as I had the chance to read Nikita Gill’s book Wild Embers.

Since this National Poetry Month, I figured this was the perfect time to share my review and reaction to Wild Embers.

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Basically, it is a well-rounded book of poetry. There was only like five poems I did not read but skim so that to me says that the sparks I was ingesting lit a fire within me that I felt the burn within each sinew of my bones.

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And I remembered my identity: a supernova burning bright to discover pathways and planets uncharted, in order to make a new way for those that come after me.

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My absolute favorite poem in the collection was this one because it made me cry which sometimes leads to a clearer perspective:

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With Rupi Kaur’s second poetry collection, she is the Sun and we, her flowers #NationalPoetryMonth

I’ll be honest, I’m not Rupi Kaur’s biggest fan

BUT

I definitely came around to seeing her talent more so with her second poetry collection The Sun and Her Flowers

With this collection, Rupi discusses some of the relationship she delved into in Milk and Honey but in more of a metaphorical way with talking between the lines about the aftershocks of love (especially love that doesn’t last) instead of a literal way with imagery of sex.

It is apparent that Kaur believes sex equals love in some shape or form, but she does do a fantastic job of discussing society’s perception of using sex to get someone to love you, when they are all wrong for you.

Discussed in this poetry collection are themes of love, grief, self-abandonment, honoring one’s roots, and empowering oneself.

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My favorite poem in the entire collection was “What Love Looks Like” because of the word choice Kaur uses to poetic describe love by using dialogue she may or may have actually had within the walls of a therapist’s office.

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So many women have daddy issues because their dad didn’t give them love in a healthy way which makes young girls go out for looking for love in all the wrong faces, and almost becoming society’s biggest joke because of it.

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Love sometimes gives us all rose-colored glasses but the worst part of heartbreak is having to remove them and come to terms with the reality that you fell in love with an idea of someone who didn’t really exist. And that hurts you more than them because you almost feel as though you can’t trust your own judgement anymore for a while.

 

 

 

#NationalPoetryMonth: La La Love by Katie Lewington Book Review

Subjectivity is poetry’s secret talent. Whether or not you find the words on the paper poetry, if a poet labels it poetry, no one can argue that it isn’t because poetry unlike fiction is more for the free-spirited and those who are exploring it’s free range in the field of writing.

For example, my favorite poet is Lang Leav and my sisters are die-hard Rupi Kaur fans.

Poetry has to use the right combination of imagery and emotion, and has to make me feel like I read something that was between the lines on the page. Few people can achieve the knock me off my feet feeling with their poetry but for me, Lang Leav comes pretty darn close.

With La La Love, Katie Lewington is in a league all her own. All poems within the chapbook showcase the different levels of vulnerability love unravels in us as we experience it within a relationship or develop the feelings.

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Picture this was one of my favorites because it reads like a spoken word poem. It has rhythm, cadence, and an overall musicality that could be performed. This also further proved that Lewington’s talent for poetry was multi-faceted, and although her book was themed with love poems, she could have you in a crowded pub or restaurant aware of every sound or gesture made by the people that were inhabiting the space between the walls.

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Katie Lewington was recently featured in a poetry anthology called

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It is a book of mental health themed poetry with proceeds that are going toward the mental health charity out of the UK, Mind. Click the image above in order to purchase the anthology.

 

#NationalPoetryMonth: An interview with Poet and Author, Mercy Jane Ballesteros

Today, I sit down and ask a few quick questions of poet and author Mercy Jane Ballesteros, she is the author of recently reviewed “Love In Between” which you can check out more about here.

How did you realize your love of writing?

Mercy: I started writing at the age of seven and from then on it has been my passion as well as a part of my life.

I noticed that you are only 21 years young. As someone who published her first two novels myself while still in high school, what motivates you to be so young and ambitious? Did you notice that people criticized you for being young and published?

 

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What inspires the writings in Love In Between?

Mercy: Most of the short stories are about my experiences since I got sick at thirteen and through writing I can pour out my emotions best. I am a homeschooled student since 2010 and I seldom go out so whenever I meet someone I will write poems about them or may it be songs as long as I am inspired it [and] it comes naturally.  

I noticed even your short stories read like poetry because they are so eloquent in word choice and syntax. What do you love writing more: poetry or prose?

Mercy: Poetry. I love writing it better than prose. 

What inspired “The Last Days of My Life” piece within Love In Between?

I fell into depression and got sick at thirteen. I wrote that as if I was going to die due to the agony I felt but “The Last Days of My Life” also narrates how I accepted my illness and I know that I am loved, and I am satisfied of what was given to me.

You are currently studying Marketing in college. What are your goals with your degree once you complete it?

Mercy: I am on my 4th year and will graduate on 2019. I am a stock market and foreign exchange trader, so I will continue to trade and seek investors for my future company. I will also focus on my writing career and continue improving my writing style. 

Would you say being from the Philippines finds its way into the heart of your work?

Mercy: Yes. My country is my pride.

If you could chat with one person living or dead, who would it be and why?

Mercy: My Dear Lord Jesus Christ. He gave me life and loved me unconditionally. He is my guide, my light. He never left my side. I love My Lord. 

Do you have any other books out or projects forthcoming? How can readers connect with you best?

I am currently writing another novel and an autobiography. Through the books I’ve written, I wanted to inspire the readers by stories that would captivate their hearts. With every word perceived, the reader and I, somehow, we have and through those pages, met.

Any advice for a young amateur or someone who has an idea but isn’t sure it will survive the cutthroat market?

Every successful person will advise every dreamer to never give up, never give in and never let go. I may not be successful yet, but If I were to ready someone I would utter the same words as I believe that success begins with a fellow’s will.

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#NationalPoetryMonth: Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur

Poetry is like reading one of those little notes you used to pass around in middle school. So short and sweet but if you found one laying on the ground or accidentally got passed one, it was like you got to be part of the secret, and you instantly felt like you weren’t alone in your feelings.

Milk and Honey is like that. It’s short, sweet, and oh so vital for today’s society. It says so much without saying it that by the end of the book, you feel as though you want to hug Rupi Kaur for all she writes about but also feel that if she hugged you back, it would be because you experienced similar situations which is why her words jumped off the page and danced before you a private ballet.

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The second read through of Milk and Honey showed the heartaches I was most familiar with and how Kaur’s words healed them.

When my sisters both read her book, I actually rolled my eyes because why would they fall head over heals for a book unless it was popular. Then, I retracted that eye roll when (plus I realized my sisters don’t read that much) I started reading it and Kaur’s words grabbed me by the shirt collar like a thug on the street looking to rob me but then mistakenly realized I was a long lost cousin and smoothed down my shirt and said, Coffee?

So we sat down metaphorically and sipped coffee and discussed the four different heartaches we’ve known:

  1.  The Hurting 
  2. The Loving
  3. The Breaking
  4. The Healing

As you can see from my notes, the poems in the Breaking and Healing sections spoke the most to my wallflower heart. Without further ado, here is some of my favorite poems shared with public permission from Rupi Kaur’s Facebook page:

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I want to marry this poem and divorce it all in the same moment.

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#NationalPoetryMonth: Pulling Words by Nicholas Trandahl

The thing about reading poetry is if you already are a poet, it awakens an innate desire to take the words before you, inhale them, and exhale them into poetry regurgitated but uniquely yours.

According to Winter Goose’s site:

With Pulling Words, a collection that simply and honestly showcases the drama and quietude of life, poet Nicholas Trandahl displays written snapshots of the world he has explored and observed. He escorts readers from his childhood in rural Virginia to his troubled time as a deployed soldier in the Middle East, and from the empty beauty of Wyoming to the quaint charm of Martha’s Vineyard.

I’ve followed Nick’s poetic journey from the beginning and liked his use of nature to stick a lens into the bigger picture of life’s greatest mysteries and moments: love, being in love, marriage, pregnancy, and reminiscing childhood truths and young adult experiences that led to make the man.

Thankfully, I found out he was releasing a poetry collection just in time and rushed into the party even if I missed the hor d’oeuvres.  What follows is my take of the collection at large and some of my favorite quotes. Yet, as a poet myself, I know that reading poetry takes a few tries before the jigsaw pieces complete the puzzle :

Trandahl takes the reader down memory lane with poems about his childhood, his time serving in the Middle East, and a poem that feels like a fly on the wall during a family vacation. Nature and outdoorsy imagery is heavily used due to the poet’s love and adoration for the outdoors.

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This is my first favorite quote from the book because for me, I am most reminiscent of certain people and places when the wind hits me a certain way. The scents, the sounds, they all come rushing back, like wind carrying souls as it moves between the trees.

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With this quote, you can see the symbolism that nature provides both the poet and the reader, that life and love is reflected in the processes of nature: we sprout, we bloom, we grow, we bend, we wilt, we wither.

Please congratulate Nicholas for me by liking him on Facebook and by sharing this review fervently.